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FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions

What if I require urgent diagnosis or treatment?

You should go through your GP or, if very urgent, your nearest Emergency Department.

You may be admitted to hospital for treatment and tests. If an ongoing neurological condition is suspected you may then be referred to specialist neurological services for diagnosis and further treatment.

What are the common tests for neurological diagnosis?

CAT scans, MRI scans, Electroencephalography (EEG) and Electromyography (EMG) are common neurological tests used in the diagnosis of neurological disorders. Blood and urine tests, x-rays, neurological examination and family history are also beneficial in the diagnosis process.

Your specialist will send you for the appropriate tests to diagnose your condition. . Some diagnostic tests are general and aim to narrow down the number of possible diagnoses. Other tests are specifically designed to confirm or eliminate a possible diagnosis.

What type of information can I expect to receive from my specialist at diagnosis?

Your specialist will explain your diagnosis and appropriate treatment options.

You may have difficulty absorbing all the information given at diagnosis and it may be beneficial, to bring a family member or trusted friend with you for support. You should also ask your specialist if there is any written information on your condition and treatment options that you can take away with you and other referrals of service they recommend.

What questions can I ask at the point of diagnosis to make sure I am fully informed of service options available to me?
  • If I need help at home with day to day living such as personal care and domestic assistance, can I get this?
  • Are there any support groups I can get in contact with?
  • If I am not able to work, where can I get information about income assistance
  • If I need transport to attend medical or social appointments, is it available?
  • Where can I get equipment to help me with daily function?
  • Where can I find assistance to return to work?
  • Are there any support and recreational services for my carer?
  • What happens after I have been given my diagnosis?
What happens after I have been given my diagnosis?

Your specialist will normally advise your GP in writing about your diagnosis and any proposed treatments by your specialist. You may then be required to make an appointment with your GP for further advice and follow up.

There is a comprehensive range of information and support services for people who live at home with long term neurological conditions.

You specialist or GP should give you information about organisations such as The Neurological Council of WA, who can assist with such services. If you are given your diagnosis in hospital, ask to be put into contact with the hospital’s social worker to assist you with service information.

What questions can I ask my specialist to make sure I am fully informed about my treatment options?
  • What are the treatment options available to me?
  • When should I start to feel the benefits of the treatment?
  • How long will my treatment last?
  • Who will manage my treatment?
  • Are there any side effects, short term and long term?
  • Will I be able to continue my current lifestyle?
  • Will I still be able to drive?
  • What if the treatment doesn’t work?
What happens after I have been given my diagnosis?

Your specialist will normally advise your GP in writing about your diagnosis and any proposed treatments by your specialist. You may then be required to make an appointment with your GP for further advice and follow up.

There is a comprehensive range of information and support services for people who live at home with long term neurological conditions.

You specialist or GP should give you information about organisations such as The Neurological Council of WA, who can assist with such services. If you are given your diagnosis in hospital, ask to be put into contact with the hospital’s social worker to assist you with service information.

What is a clinical trial?

A clinical trial is a rigorously controlled test of a new treatment. Clinical trials assess the efficacy and safety of a new treatment before it is made available for wider use. There is generally no extra cost to participate and participants should be able to change their mind and leave the trial at any time. Information about a trial will be outlined in its protocol (plan). Before you participate in a clinical trial, it recommended that you explore the details with your medical practitioner.